Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Summer Classes

I never considered going to summer school until I came to Clark College.

In the fall quarter I wrote a paper for English 102. I argued that year-round education benefits both students and teachers. Year-round education prevents summer learning loss for students and allows teachers to work for extra income.

Now I’m taking two summer classes, PE and Health.  I realize summer classes offer even more benefits than I discussed in my paper.

Taking summer classes keeps me following a daily routine of going to school and doing homework.

I stay in the habit of waking up to an alarm clock.

I wake up early enough to enjoy the entire day.

I have PE at 8 in the morning, which wakes me up better than a cup of coffee does.

I’m earning college credits.

I finish my classes at 10 a.m. so I can have fun the rest of the day.

What are your reasons for taking summer classes?

Advertisements

HP Mini 210

One of my bad habits is spending money impulsively.

Ironically, I usually spend time on the internet researching things I want to buy. I watch YouTube reviews and read product descriptions, user comments and reviews before buying something.

Sometimes, however, I see something I want, and I buy it.

Last Wednesday, for example, I had a conversation about laptops and netbooks with my teacher Bill Lascher and my friend and colleague Daniel Hampton. Our discussion resulted in me wanting to buy a netbook, even though I have access to a computer at school and home, a laptop and an iPod Touch.

But immediately after my Multimedia Journalism class, I went onto Craigslist and bought a HP Mini 210 for $130.

The retail price of the HP netbook is about $300. In fact, the price sticker on the box it came in was $299.95.

Fortunately, I don’t regret my impulsive purchase.  Rather, I’m satisfied that I made the instantaneous decision to buy it.

The HP Mini 210 was originally purchased less than a week before at the Portland Community College book store. The lady I bought it from logged into her PCC student account page and showed me an electronic copy of her receipt.  She said she only turned on the computer once.

The HP Mini 210 has a 1.6 GHz processor speed, which is faster than my laptop’s. However, it’s not powerful enough, graphically or speedily, to play PC games like Starcraft II. Nonetheless, for weighing only three pounds and costing only $130, I consider my netbook a bargain.

The latest edition of The Independent came out on Wednesday, wrapping up Clark College’s newspaper production for the 2011-2012 school year.

The following links are stories I’ve written for The Independent during the spring quarter. I look forward to writing many more and leading The Independent staff next year as Editor-in-Chief.

Convicted felon appointed to student government

Student to serve on board of trustees

First draft of S&A budget clears finance committee

Emergency evacuation drill at Clark College

Elections: who cares?

Requested records are denied

Nursing instructor serves overseas

Students get too much credit, debt piles up

Cook appointed to V.P.

Today is the last day of Blogathon 2012, and I’m burned out.

I’ve posted one blog per day for the past month, and every post took me, on average, an hour to write.

However, I look forward to tackling the month-long blogging challenge again next spring, but I plan to proceed with a more organized approach.

On most days, for example, I spent at least 15 minutes brainstorming topics to blog about.

Next year before Blogathon begins, I will brainstorm blog topics and schedule days when I’ll write them. I also plan to participate in the theme days, such as Guest Post Exchange Day and Haiku Day.

Additionally, I regret not joining the Blogathon Google Group this year. More than 250 bloggers participated in Blogathon 2012, and many of them joined the online group, networked with other bloggers and supported each other.

Next year I will take advantage of this wonderful resource.

Tomorrow, May 31, is the last day of Blogathon 2012, and the last day that I will blog every night.

On April 16, I created my blog and started blogging because it’s required for my Multimedia Journalism class, which meets every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. I participated in Blogathon 2012, however, because I wanted to improve my writing and get used to writing under deadline pressure.

However, I intend to continue blogging about the future of journalism from a student journalist’s perspective.

Once Blogathon ends, I will continue to blog on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. But I’m looking forward to loosening the constraints of blogging every day. In other words, participating in Blogathon has been stressful, and I’m excited to relieve this stress.

Nonetheless, participating in Blogathon has been a difficult but rewarding experience, and I can’t wait to attempt it again next spring!

Every night for the past month I’ve put away my homework, cleared my desk and got ready for bed.

But before I slept, I opened up a notebook, double-clicked on Microsoft Word and blogged.

In two days, I will complete the fifth annual WordCount Blogathon, a month-long blogging challenge requiring participants to blog every day in May.

I signed up for Blogathon 2012 with hopes that blogging consistently would improve my writing and that I would get used to writing under deadline pressure, which in this case is every night at midnight.

I’ve struggled some nights to meet my deadline. One night, I finished blogging around 11:50 p.m. I’m thankful my wireless internet connection survived, otherwise my Blogathon streak would have died.

However, participating in Blogathon has refined my time management skills.

Since blogging typically takes me an hour or more, I’ve been forced to pencil “blogging” into my schedule. And even though blogging every day isn’t essential, or even very important at all, it’s an additional responsibility that I assumed when I started.

In addition to time management, I’ve learned much more than I imagined by participating in Blogathon 2012, and I plan on blogging about it soon.

Beach trip

My sister and I spent the day in Astoria, Oregon, and Long Beach, Washington. During our trip, I took lots of pictures for my Multimedia Journalism class. I’m creating a slideshow in that class using a program called Soundslides. After spending all day at the beach, I sped home and started uploading photos to my computer so I could whip together a slideshow. By the time I finished making the slideshow and tried embedding it to my website, I received a notification that Soundslides can’t convert the file because I have the demo version.

Oh well. Anyway, here are a few pictures of our beach trip.